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BEES’ FAVOURITES and OTHER FLOWERS

We have grown many flowers in our North London garden over the years. Some are wildflowers which have always lived here; others are internationals. Bees and other pollinators visit their favourites for the pollen and nectar they offer. We try to make space for as many bee-friendly flowers as possible.

Bumblebee on teasel

Bumblebee on Teasel

Scroll down to bottom of page for selected reading list and websites.

NATIVE WILDFLOWERS

Some UK wildflowers may have one or more common names, acquired over centuries. They may be known by other names in different parts of the country. A British wildflower may also be a European native, and be called something else abroad. Using a plant’s Latin name helps to avoid confusion.

Part of the pleasure of growing a native wildflower is knowing it has lived a life and earned itself a reputation, and perhaps a folkname or two. It is worth learning some of these folknames. When someone asks you, ‘What’s this one, then?’ you can answer ‘Kiss Me Quick’, or ‘Granny’s Toenails’.

 

CLICK YOUR MOUSE ON A FLOWER NAME OR IMAGE FOR MORE …

Betony
BETONY
(Stachys officinalis)
Birdsfoot trefoilBIRDSFOOT TREFOIL
(Lotus corniculatus)
Bittersweet
BITTERSWEET
(Solanum dulcamara)
WRC1 Red Campion cropped
CAMPION – Red
(Silene dioica)
SAMSUNG
CAMPION – White
(Silene alba)
Centaurea montana
CENTAUREA MONTANA
(Mountain Cornflower)
Cirsium rivulare for Bees faves page
CIRSIUM RIVULARE
(Plume thistle)
Paz2 - Perle d'Azur bloom
CLEMATIS
‘Perle d’Azur’
clover 54
CLOVER – Dutch or White
(Trifolium repens)
WCornflower
CORNFLOWER
(Centaurea cyanus)
Corn Marigold
CORN MARIGOLD
(Chrysanthium segetum)
2014 - Mystery Bug on Creeping ButtercupCREEPING BUTTERCUP
(Ranunculus repens)
Dandelion
DANDELION
(Taraxum officinale)
English Ivy 3 Sept
ENGLISH IVY
(Hedera helix)
Foxglove, Bee
FOXGLOVE
(Digitalis purpurea)
Hedge Garlic
GARLIC MUSTARD
(Alliaria petiolata)
HG1 Hardy geranium Oxonianum 'Wargrave Pink'
GERANIUM x Oxonianum
(Cranesbill)
‘Wargrave Pink’
Mrs Kendall Clarke
GERANIUM pratense
(Cranesbill)
‘Mrs Kendall-Clarke’
Alkanet .jpg
GREEN ALKANET
(Pentaglottis sempervirens)
Hedge Bindweed. Honeybee
HEDGE BINDWEED
(Calystegia sepium)
Hedge Woundwort
HEDGE WOUNDWORT
(Stachys sylvatica)
Herb Robert
HERB ROBERT
(Geranium robertianum)
Honeysuckle one
HONEYSUCKLE
(Lonicera periclymenum)
Ivy-Leaved Toadflax
IVY-LEAVED TOADFLAX
(Linaria cymbalaria)
Lamium Maculatum
LAMIUM MACULATUM
(Spotted Deadnettle)
Lavender, Bumblebee
LAVENDER
(Lavandula angustifolia)
Lemon Balm
LEMON BALM/BEE BALM
( Melissa officinalis)
Knapweed, Honeybee
LESSER KNAPWEED
(Centaurea nigra)
Meadowsweet
MEADOWSWEET
(Filipendula ulmaria)
MINT - Applemint, Honeybee
MINTS
– APPLEMINT, BLACK PEPPERMINT
Oxeye Daisy
OXEYE DAISY
(Leucanthenum vulgare)
Potentilla
POTENTILLA
(Cinquefoil)
Purple Loosestrife
PURPLE LOOSESTRIFE
(Lythrum salicaria)
Pyracantha
PYRACANTHA
(Firethorn)
Centranthus ruber Valerian May 25 2015
RED VALERIAN
(Centranthus ruber)
WSalad Burnet in wildflower square
SALAD BURNET
(Sanguisorba minor)

SELF-HEAL
(Prunella vulgaris)
Sweet Woodruff
SWEET WOODRUFF
(Galium odoratum)
Teasel, Bumblebee
TEASEL
(Dipsacus fullonum)
vipers
VIPER’S BUGLOSS
(Echium vulgare)
Woad
WOAD
(Isatis tinctoria)
SAMSUNG
YELLOW LOOSESTRIFE
(Lysimachia vulgaris)
INTERNATIONALS

Many native wildflowers bloom for only a few months. A wildlife-friendly garden should aim to provide pollen and nectar for as many months as possible for bees, butterflies, hoverflies and other insects. Choosing plants from elsewhere on the planet, with flowering times earlier or later than our natives, can help to make your garden worth a pollinator’s visit for most of the year.

These plants, native to countries beyond Europe, have done well (with a few exceptions) for North London bees and other winged creatures over the last ten years:

CLICK YOUR MOUSE ON A FLOWER NAME OR IMAGE FOR MORE …


AGASTACHE ‘Blackadder’
(Giant Hyssop, Licorice Hyssop)
Allium Christophii.JPG
ALLIUM Christophii
(Ornamental onion)
Allium 'Globemaster'
ALLIUM ‘Globemaster’
(Ornamental onion)
Angel's Trumpets, Brugmansia
ANGEL’S TRUMPETS
(Brugmansia suaveolens)
Monarda 'Squaw'
BEE BALM
(Monarda didyma)

BLEEDING HEART
(Lamprocampnos spectabilis)
blueberry flwrs close up P1030517
BLUEBERRY
(Vaccinium corymbosum)
WBorage buds
BORAGE
(Borago officinalis)
Buddleia
BUDDLEIA
(The Butterfly Bush)
Ceratostigma Willmottianum
CERATOSTIGMA WILLMOTTIANUM
(Chinese Plumbago)

CHRISTMAS BOX
(Sarcococca)
GPk Coneflowers crop thumbnail
CONEFLOWER
(Echinacea)
B4 Baytree Corner - Coreopsis and trunk of fallen Damson, probably 2003
COREOPSIS
(Tickseed)
web - Delphinium crop
DELPHINIUM
(Pacific Hybrid)
Felicia
FELICIA AMELLOIDES
(Blue Daisy)
Gaillardia, Hoverfly sh
GAILLARDIA
(Blanketflower) ‘Goblin’
Hardy G 'Philippe Vapelle' for Bees Faves page
GERANIUM renardii
x Geranium platypetalum (Cranesbill)
‘Philippe Vapelle’
Hardy Geranium wallichianum 'Buxton's Blue' crop
GERANIUM wallichianum
(Cranesbill)
‘Buxton’s Variety’

HELENIUM
(Helen’s flower)
Heuchera leaf
HEUCHERA micrantha
‘Palace Purple’ ‘Palace Purple’ (Coral Bells)
Ice Plant
ICE PLANT
(Sedum Spectabile)
Japanese Anemone
JAPANESE ANEMONE
(Anemone x hybrida; Windflower)
Lovage
LOVAGE
(Ligustrum vulgare)
Ipomoea Morning Glory 'Heavenly Blue'
MORNING GLORY
(Ipomoea tricolor)
‘Heavenly Blue’
Nasturtium 'Alaska'
NASTURTIUM(Tropaeolum)

Passionflower

PASSIONFLOWER(Passiflora)

Eryngium, Sea Holly
SEA HOLLY
(Eryngium)
Scabious, Bumblebee
SMALL SCABIOUS
(Scabiosa columbaria)
Sunflower
SUNFLOWER
(Helianthus)
Wild Carrot
WILD CARROT
(Daucus carota)
READING LIST AND WEBSITES

Chris Baines cvrHOW TO MAKE A WILDLIFE GARDEN, by Chris Baines, Frances Lincoln Ltd (revised edition), copyright 1985. First published by Elm Tree Books/Hamish Hamilton, 2000.

This book was recommended to me by Wildlife Rangers at the Ecology Centre. It is based on Chris Baines’ wildflower garden for the 1985 Chelsea Flower Show (the first wildflower garden ever at Chelsea) and a TV programme, ‘Bluetits and Bumblebees’ (1985). It is filled with ideas; its author’s warmth and enthusiasm come through on every page.

There are chapters on wildflower meadows, garden ponds, climber-covered screens and cottage garden service stations. Flowers, native and ‘garden border’, are grouped by colour, height, and flowering times, with tales of how wildlife uses each one. You can delve into this book in the dead of winter and find inspiration for the season to come. Look up Chris Baines on the web and read about his ongoing environmental work, including water sustainability at the Athletes’ Village, London 2012.

Thanks to television, radio and the internet, it is easier now to find wildlife expertise than it was in 1985. But this book is as relevant today as it was then. You will not regret bringing it into your life and letting its ideas influence your garden.

CHARLOTTE VOAKE'S LITTLE GUIDE TO WILDFLOWERS, EDEN PROJECTA LITTLE GUIDE TO WILD FLOWERS by Charlotte Voake * Text by Kate Petty *

Published in Great Britain by Eden Project Books, 2007

* Imprint, Transworld Publishers

* Div. of the Random House Group Ltd.

 

* www.kidsatrandomhouse.co.uk * www.edenproject.com

This little book, by award-winning children’s book illustrator Charlotte Voake, can be enjoyed by adults as well as children. Each native wildflower is illustrated, with a hand-printed tale of where it grows, when it flowers and how it got its name. Has it fed, healed or poisoned us? Birds, animals, insects and children appear throughout.

The selection of native plants includes Chickweed, Milkwort and Shepherd’s Purse, all small and easily overlooked by many of us. Pages at the back are left blank ( ‘My Wild-Flower Scrapbook’ ) for drawings, paintings or photos of wildflowers: ‘Make sure you date all your entries – this could be a useful document one day!’

The Eden Project brings plants and people together. It is dedicated to developing a greater understanding of our shared global garden, encouraging us to respect plants – and to protect them.

Rich's book cover with green borderNATURE’S FORGOTTEN FOLKLORE: Myths and Magic in Islington

* Richard Meyers *

In this booklet for Islington Council, Conservation Ranger Richard Meyers collects some of the stories, folknames and legends surrounding our local wildlife. There are traditions from a rural way of life before the industrial revolution, and tales from other countries who share some of our flora and fauna.

Those who came on Richard’s guided walks or joined him and the team for a Volunteer Day will have heard these and other stories. This booklet is, in Richard’s words, merely scratching the surface.

Available free, while stocks last, from Islington Ecology Centre, 191 Drayton Park, London N5 1PH (by personal visit rather than by post.)

THE POLLINATOR GARDEN . http://www.foxleas.com/ . 2006-2016

A Pollinator border

Marc Carlton’s 2010 cottage garden pollinator border, designed to attract wild bees & hoverflies.

Naturalist & gardener Marc Carlton based this educational website on the garden he created in S London. Marc, who now lives & gardens in Chepstow, between Wales and Shropshire, is usually available locally (Bristol & S Wales) for talks. The website is meant to be downloaded & the information used in a not-for-profit way.

This website will help you create your own pollinator garden. Information includes: Choosing a sunny site; Creating shelter from prevailing cold wind; Grouping flowers of the same kind in large drifts; Planning for a succession of flowers throughout the whole growing season; Minimising or avoiding the use of pesticides.

* How insects feed from flowers
* A planting list for pollinators
* The basics of nature-friendly gardening
* Garden meadows
* Recommended reading lists
* Links to helpful sites
* Nature gardens in Holland and Germany, and a North American page for readers in the USA/Canada

 

Marc’s pollinator garden principles:

“The UK is nothing more than a peninsula of Europe, and has only been separated for some 8,000 years, after a brief post-glacial period of recolonisation across the north sea land bridge. Our flora is a shared subset of that of western Europe, as is our insect fauna. I choose western Europe as the main region of origin of plants for my pollinator border.”

“My second principle is to concentrate on flower forms which are close to nature, so no double flowers, complex hybrids or horticultural novelties.”

“I also include a wide variety of flower shapes and sizes, to help cater for the diversity of insect mouthparts and specialisations evolved to tackle different forms of flower.”

 

The website for the LONDON BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION, www.lbka.org.uk/ has information on urban beekeeping, purchasing bees, and an excellent list of recommended pollinator plants.

“If you’re looking for our details on window box planting, you can find them here. The LBKA has an active programme of helping plants in a way that benefits bees and pollinating insects. We work with academics, ecologists, councils and park authorities and our pollinator friendly seed mix is distributed free at events thanks to our sponsor, Ashurst.

Finsbury Park Honey with admirer

Bees and other pollinators need the right type of flowers to obtain pollen (protein) and nectar (carbohydrate). London has a lot of parks and gardens and the long flowering season of its diverse plants gives London’s honey its characteristic complex taste. However, the planting policies of parks and the flowers people choose to grow are not necessarily good for bees… it is increasingly important that we ensure enough forage and diversity of forage to keep London’s pollinating insects alive and healthy for the entire season.”

Honeybees visiting our Highbury garden were coming, we found, from a beehive one street away. We read the interview with its beekeeper, Peter Buckoke, in Nicola Baird’s entertaining Islington Faces blog, and were able to capture a few jars of Peter’s Finsbury Park Honey from Bumblebee Natural Foods in Camden. Delicious.

http://www.bumblebee.london/

PLANT-LORE is an Archive of local names, herbal remedies, sayings, riddles, tales, legends and more. The Compiler of the Archive, Roy Vickery, is a botanist, lecturer and author born in rural Dorset but now living in South London. On his extensive website he keeps up with local traditional activities – Autumn 2016 includes flower and tree walks, Apple Day, rushbearing and the Tooting Common Pumpkin Parade.
The Compiler is available for walks and talks.

 

Roy Vickery welcomes information on plants from all parts of the British Isles, ethnic groups settled in the British Isles, and comparative material from overseas, no matter how widespread and well-known you consider it to be. A copy of all material received will eventually be placed in the care of the library of The Natural History Museum.

See the website for details.

PLANT-LORE . Collecting the folklore and uses of plants

Roy Vickery, 9 Terrapin Court, Terrapin Road, London SW17 8QW.

 

COUNTRY DIARY COVER

EDITH HOLDENTHE COUNTRY DIARY OF AN EDWARDIAN LADY, published by Michael Joseph in 1977, was created by naturalist, illustrator and art teacher EDITH HOLDEN in 1905-06.

Edith painted the wildflowers, birds and other wildlife she saw, walking or cycling through countryside around her home in Orton, Warwickshire. The book moves through the seasons, pages filled with botanical paintings, country traditions, poems, the weather…

Cycling was popular; many women, laced into the tight corsets and long dresses of the Victorian era, now chose to wear ‘rational dress’, such as loose-fitting trousers (knickerbockers) for cycling. Some men objected… only eight years earlier, male students at Cambridge had hanged a woman riding a bicycle, in effigy, to protest the admission of women to the college. It is our good fortune that Edith Holden was able to cycle into the countryside and record what she saw there. In this book we see it as it was a century ago, through her eyes.

WIKIPEDIA: EDITH HOLDEN

web RHS A-Z Brickell retouchThe Royal Horticultural Society A-Z ENCYCLOPEDIA OF GARDEN PLANTS was the book most used by our class at Capel Manor in 1999. Each plant’s entry includes both its Latin and English names, its country of origin, the height and width it attains in favourable conditions, details of those conditions (soil type, sun or shade, and so on) and pests or diseases to which it may succumb. There may be an updated version of it by now.

Go to TheRHS website for help with choosing plants, gardening advice, gardens to visit, events, courses, shows, gardening jobs to be doing now and how to join The RHS.

www.rhs.org.uk/

WILD ABOUT GARDENS (www.wildaboutgardens.org.uk/)

Image result for wild about gardens logoRoyal Horticultural Society logo.png
Image result for wildlife trusts logo
is a joint initiative between The Royal Horticultural Society(www.rhs.org.uk/) and The WildlifeTrusts (www.wildlifetrusts.org/) offering information, project ideas and a monthly newsletter aimed at helping us attract more wildlife to our gardens. There is a wildlife blog by Miranda Hodgson, and profiles on more than 200 birds, mammals, reptiles and plants.